Why Is Green Oak Ideal for Frame Structures?

Posted on Jul 24 2017 - 5:45pm by Ella

Green oak (also known as fresh sawn oak) is unseasoned, meaning that it hasn’t been allowed to dry out since being cut. Since it will dry out over time, changing shape a little and getting thinner as it does so, it’s a material that people often avoid using. That said, green oak does come with certain advantages that make it ideal for certain projects. For example, green oak can make an excellent choice if you’re looking for frame structures, and here are just three reasons why.

  1. Tighter Joins

It’s easy to be put off by the fact that green oak shrinks as it ages, a process that tends to take around 12 to 18 months. However, that shrinkage comes with a few benefits. Most importantly for frame structures, it forces all the joints to shrink in conjunction with each other, creating much tighter joins in the process for a more stable frame. There are few things more important than stability when you’re looking for frame structure, so green oak is well worth keeping in mind.

  1. Tougher Surfaces

If there’s a factor that rivals the importance of stability, it’s strength, and this is another area in which green oak comes out ahead. As it dries, it becomes a lot harder. This might lead you to believe that it’s better to simply invest in seasoned timber right away, but the hardening process is a lot more advantageous if it happens in situ. If you want evidence, just look to most of the historical structures across the country; they will have been made using green timber that dried out in situ, and that’s one reason why those structures have lasted through hundreds of years.

  1. Added Character

Finally, plenty of people prefer using green oak simply because it adds a little character. This is obviously only going to be a persuasive benefit if you’re opting for exposed beams, but it’s still one well worth keeping in mind. As your timber ages, it will shrink down and split in certain areas, creating a cool weathered appearance that will perfectly match the age of the entire structure.